Everett Hit & Run Defense Attorney

Hit & Run Lawyer Serving Lynnwood, Everett and Snohomish County, WA

A person can be charged with a crime if they are involved in an auto accident and leave the scene without properly identifying themselves. The criminal charge can range from a simple misdemeanor offense to a felony charge depending upon the facts of the case. The State can impose jail time and the Washington Department of Licensing (DOL) will suspend your privilege to drive upon a conviction for a hit and run offense. A Lynnwood criminal defense attorney should be sought immediately upon being charged with a crime. When your rights are one the line, the first thing you should do is take the necessary steps to ensure they are well protected.

Providing Skillful and Aggressive Defense

There are several defenses to a hit and run charge and the facts are often not as simple as stated in the police reports. Is it a crime if you did not know the other vehicle sustained damage? What if you bumped a car while parallel parking? What if you are too afraid to exchange information with the other driver? Can the criminal case be dismissed if the damage was paid in full? What if it was your first criminal law violation? It is imperative that you know your rights and that you properly assert all available defenses.

You need to have an Everett hit and run lawyer on your side who is dedicated to criminal defense. Attorney Michael P. Sheehy limits his practice to criminal law and as a former Prosecutor he has the knowledge and experience to help clients avoid steep fines, jail time, and license suspensions. Mr. Sheehy personally handles each and every case and he will get the results you deserve.

Contact us for a free initial consultation with a Lynnwood hit and run attorney at our firm right away!

Internet Marketing Experts The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.